The EOS® Imaging System

How is this new technology being used?
Saint Peter’s University Hospital is the only hospital in New Jersey to offer the EOS® system, a new low-dose, full-body orthopedic medical imaging system for children and adults. Based on X-ray technology, it captures two full-body, weight-bearing images simultaneously. Using these two full-body images, a 3D model of the skeletal system is created to further evaluate bone-related degeneration and deformities, such as scoliosis. The standing images of the whole body are best for viewing the spine and the body’s balance while the body is in a normal, weight-bearing position. This clear, one full spine image is best for evaluating scoliosis, especially in children.
 
What is scoliosis?
A deformity of the backbone which creates an S or C shape of the spine and limits physical flexibility. It is most often in children between 10 and 18, and affects girls more than boys. Through an innovative new surgical technique, Anterior Scoliosis Correction, we can correct the curvature of the spine, even in severe cases, while providing flexibility and restoring quality of life.

EOS® Imaging System
What’s different about the EOS® System?
Most X-ray images are taken in a series while lying down. The advantage of capturing images of the knee and spine while standing is that we are able to evaluate posture and better understand how the spine and lower limbs are working together.
 
How low is low-dose?
The EOS system delivers 50 percent to 85 percent less radiation than X-rays and 95 percent less than computed tomography. Reducing the radiation dose is particularly beneficial for children with scoliosis who need to be imaged frequently. A full-body exam takes less than 15 seconds for a child and less than 20 seconds for an adult. The system captures full-body images in a single scan.
 
How long will the exam take?
An EOS full body exam takes less than 20 seconds for an adult and less than 15 seconds for a child.
 
How many X-rays are taken? 
The EOS system captures full body images in a single scan. 
 
 

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